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Wednesday, August 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of further contribution of knowledge of the host relations of the parasitic cowbirds found in the catalog.

further contribution of knowledge of the host relations of the parasitic cowbirds

Herbert Friedmann

further contribution of knowledge of the host relations of the parasitic cowbirds

by Herbert Friedmann

  • 253 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by Smithsonian Institution Press in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cowbirds.,
  • Parasitic birds.,
  • Birds -- North America.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementHerbert Friedmann, Lloyd F. Kiff, and Stephen I. Rothstein.
    SeriesSmithsonian contributions to zoology ; no. 235, Smithsonian contributions to zoology -- no. 235.
    ContributionsKiff, Lloyd F., Rothstein, Stephen I., Smithsonian Institution.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQL1 .S54 no. 235
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiii, 75 p. ;
    Number of Pages75
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18715533M
    LC Control Number76608075

    The Brown-headed Cowbird is known to use the nests of more than other bird species, and cowbirds in general are believed to play a role in the decline of some migratory songbird populations. These brood parasites—birds that lay their eggs in the nests of others—have long flourished in North America. In this timely book, Catherine Ortega summarizes and synthesizes a wealth of. Further Reading The Impact of Parasites on Host Individuals and Host Populations Further Reading Parasite–Host Coevolution Main Features of Coevolution Role of Alleles in Coevolution Rareness Is an Advantage Malaria as an Example of Coevolution Further Reading

    The shiny cowbird (Molothrus bonariensis) is a passerine bird in the New World family breeds in most of South America except for dense forests and areas of high altitude such as mountains. Since the shiny cowbirds' range has shifted northward, and it was recorded in the Caribbean islands as well as the United States, where it is found breeding in southern Florida. ROTHSTEIN. function andkvolution of aggressive host behavior A further contribution to the knowledge of towards the Brown-headed Cowbird IMolothrus host relations of the parasitic cowbirds.

    Nat. Friedmann, H., L. F. Kiff and S. I. Rothstein. A further contribution to knowledge of the host relations of the parasitic cowbirds. A Further Contribution to Knowledge of the Host Relations of the Parasitic Cowbirds. FRIEDMANN, Herbert, Lloyd KIFF, and Stephen I. ROTHSTEIN. Ecological Isolation in Birds. LACK, David. Find any book at the best price; By using the Web site, you confirm that you have read, understood.


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Further contribution of knowledge of the host relations of the parasitic cowbirds by Herbert Friedmann Download PDF EPUB FB2

A Further Contribution to Knowledge of the Host Relations of the Parasitic Gowbirds Herbert Friedmann, Lloyd F. Kiff, and Stephen I. Rothstein Introduction The present paper brings together a vast amount of new information documenting and clarifying the relations existing between the many kinds of victims of the several cowbird species and their.

Friedmann, Herbert, Kiff, Lloyd F., and Rothstein, Stephen I. "A further contribution of knowledge of the host relations of the parasitic cowbirds."Smithsonian. A further contribution of knowledge of the host relations of the parasitic cowbirds Author: Herbert Friedmann ; Lloyd F Kiff ; Stephen I Rothstein ; Smithsonian Institution.

Further contribution to knowledge of the host relations of the parasitic cowbirds (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Herbert Friedmann; Lloyd F Kiff; Stephen I Rothstein; Smithsonian Institution.

A Further Contribution to Knowledge of the Host Relations of the Perasitic Cowbirds Article (PDF Available) in Smithsonian Libraries () January with 50 Reads How we measure 'reads'. Further contribution to knowledge of the host relations of the parasitic cowbirds (DLC) (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors.

Further Information on the Host Relations of the Parasitic Cowbirds; Further Information on the Host Relations of the Parasitic Cowbirds. Herbert Friedmann. Publication Information.

Journal: Auk. Volume: Issue: 2 (April-June) Year: Pages: Attachment Size; pppdf. FURTHER INFORMATION ON THE HOST RELATIONS OF THE PARASITIC COWBIRDS HERBERT FRIEDMANN Ta•s paper brings together a number of recent records involving addi- tional hosts of some of the species of cowbirds, and some that amplify earlier data on previously known victims.

Some of these have been gathered. Young brood parasites that tolerate the company of host offspring challenge the existing evolutionary view of family life. In theory, all parasitic nestlings should be ruthlessly self-interested and should kill host offspring soon after hatching.

Yet many species allow host young to live, even though they are rivals for host resources. Here we show that the tolerance of host nestlings by the. H. Friedmann, L.F. Kiff, S.I. RothsteinA further contribution to knowledge of the host relations of the parasitic cowbirds Smithsonian Contributions.

Host relations of the parasitic cowbirds, US Nat Mus Bull,vol. (pg. ) Google Scholar. Crossref. Search ADS Friedmann. H, Kiff.

LF, Rothstein. A further contribution to knowledge of host relations of the parasitic cowbirds, Smithson Contrib Zool. Get this from a library. Host relations of the parasitic cowbirds. [Herbert Friedmann; Museum of Natural History (U.S.),; Smithsonian Institution,] -- Cowbirds are an ideal group in which to study the biology of brood parasitism; within the six included species there are displayed all stages of the development of this mode of reproduction ranging.

In contrast to the cuckoo, the cowbird is a generalist at the level of both the species and the individual. Compared with the ∼50 species of parasitic cuckoos, there are only five species of parasitic cowbirds.

Within this New World group, the primitive species is a host specialist and the increasingly derived species are increasingly.

The book's goals are to explore the biology of cowbirds, the threats they pose to host species and populations, and the management programs that are being undertaken to minimize these threats. The book is organized into five sections, each with an extended editors' introduction that places the contributions in a broad, up-to-date setting.

Parasitism is a kind of symbiosis, a close and persistent long-term biological interaction between a parasite and its saprotrophs, parasites feed on living hosts, though some parasitic fungi, for instance, may continue to feed on hosts they have commensalism and mutualism, the parasitic relationship harms the host, either feeding on it or, as in the case of intestinal.

A Further Contribution to Knowledge of the Host Relations of the Parasitic Cowbirds. Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology. volp. Garrett KL & Molina KC.

A field observation of the head-down display in the Bronzed Cowbird. Friedmann H, Kiff LF, Rothstein SI () A further contribution to knowledge of the host relations of the parasitic cowbirds. Smithson Contrib Zool –75 Google Scholar. Habitat selection for parasite‐free space by hosts of parasitic cowbirds.

Jukka T. Forsman. Search for more papers by this author Host species that made settlement decisions during manipulations were significantly less abundant in the cowbird treatment as a group. These results suggest that hosts of cowbirds can use vocal cues to.

Cowbirds thus can place powerful selection pressure on a host bird species to learn to recognize and reject cowbird eggs.

Behaviorist Stephen Rothstein of the University of California at Santa Barbara has shown experimentally that some North American species have, indeed, learned to do this.

This study of the parasitic weaverbirds is an entity in itself, complete as far as available permit. It is also a part of a general survey of the problem of avian brood parasitism, in the course of which, besides many families of parasitic birds wre issued by the author on cowbirds (), on African cuckoos (), and on honey-guides ().

Evolutionary lag and resistance to puncture-ejection are two hypotheses explaining why hosts long exposed to brood parasitism by molothrine cowbirds accept their eggs.

The former hypothesis assumes no physical constraints while the latter requires them. We show (1) that most acceptors of Brown-headed Cowbird eggs have small bills, (2) that the single species known to puncture cowbird eggs for.

Neither of these eggs resembles a cowbird egg (Plate IX, Fig. 1). Further more,work on other rejecter-species shows the rejection response is not specific to cowbird eggs (Rothstein c, unpublished).

Thus, I will restrict further consideration to the following two mechanisms: II. Biologists find secret to parasitic cowbird success: They join nestmates in making noise, then hog the food.

By Robert Sanders, Public Affairs | 5 August BERKELEY – America's brown-headed cowbird and the European cuckoo are the classic parasitic birds, laying their eggs in the nests of other bird species and leaving the chick-rearing to another parent.